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FrontPage 98 Problem Solving

 

Tips on using fonts.
FrontPage 98 includes font selection controls similar to a word processor, allowing you to use any font installed on your system in your FP98 documents. Before using non-standard fonts on your Web pages, remember that only users that have those same fonts installed on their systems will be able to view the document as you intended. In other words, if you select Viner Hand ITC as the body font for your Web page, viewers of that page must also have Viner Hand ITC installed on their systems. This problem is further complicated by the fact that most Macintosh fonts have different names than their Windows 95 equivalents. 

There are three fonts that viewers of your Website are almost guaranteed to have on their systems. These are Times New Roman (a serif font and the FrontPage 98 default font), Courier New (a mono spaced font also called Courier on Macintosh systems) and Arial (a sans-serif font also called Helvetica on the Macintosh). If you want to use a font other than these three, that's okay; be sure you also add one of these three fonts after your specialized font in the <font face=""> tags.

Times New Roman is the default font so you don't need to do anything special to use it. Remember, anytime you want to change any text in your Web page to the default settings, select the text in the FrontPage Editor, then choose Remove Formatting from the Format menu. 

If you want to use a standard sans-serif font, follow these steps to insure the document will display correctly on both Windows 95 and Macintosh based browsers: 

     

  1. Select the text you wish to modify in the FrontPage 98 Editor.
  2. Choose Arial from the drop down font menu on the tool bar (or choose Font... from the Format menu, then choose Arial).
  3. Click the HTML tab at the bottom left of the window.
  4. Locate the section of your document that contains the tag: <font face="Arial">. Note that there may be other items in the font tag (for example, your font tag might look something like: <font color="#FFFFFF" size="1" face="Arial">. All we're interested in is what's between the face quotes. Leave the rest alone.
  5. After the world Arial type: ",Helvetica". Don't forget the comma. The tag should now read something like: <font face="Arial,Helvetica">.
  6. Go back to step 4 if you have more than one <font face="Arial"> tag in the document (you probably do).
  7. Click the Normal tag to return to the standard view. That's it!

If you want to use a standard mono spaced or typewriter style font follow these steps to insure the document will display correctly on both Windows 95 and Macintosh based browsers: 

     

  1. Select the text you wish to modify in the FrontPage 98 Editor.
  2. Choose Font... from the Format menu.
  3. Click the Typewriter check box, and choose Courier New in the Font selection box.
  4. Click the OK button. That's it!

If you want to use a non-standard font in your Web page, follow these steps to insure the document will display as closely as possible to your original design in all browsers. In this example, we will use Verdana (a popular Windows 95 sans-serif font) as the non-standard font. Substitute the font you wish for Verdana in the steps below. 

     

  1. Select the text you wish to modify in the FrontPage 98 Editor.
  2. Choose Verdana from the drop down font menu on the tool bar (or choose Font... from the Format menu, then choose Verdana).

Because Verdana is a non-standard font, we add secondary fonts to display in the user's browser in the event they don't have Verdana installed on their computer. Verdana is a sans-serif font, so Arial is a good second choice (with Helvetica as the Macintosh equivalent). If you're using a serif font, you may want to use Times New Roman as your secondary choice. 

     

  1. Click the HTML tab at the bottom left of the window.
  2. Locate the section of your document that contains the tag: <font face="Verdana">. Note that there may be other items in the font tag (for example, your font tag might look something like: <font color="#FFFFFF" size="1" face="Verdana">. All we're interested in is what's between the face quotes. Leave the rest alone.
  3. After the world Verdana type: ",Arial,Helvetica". Don't forget the commas. The tag should now read something like: <font face="Verdana,Arial,Helvetica">.
  4. Go back to step 4 if you have more than one <font face="Verdana"> tag in the document (you probably do).
  5. Close the HTML editing window. That's it!
When you have multiple fonts listed in the face tag (for example, <font face="Verdana,Arial,Helvetica">), Web browsers will try to use the first font listed and if they can't find it installed in the computer they will try the second font, then the third and so on. If the browser can't find any of the fonts, the text will be displayed in the browser's default font (usually Times New Roman).

Note: Although 1stcom has made every effort to make sure the information here is accurate and correct, everyone's setup is different and what works on one system may not work on another. Always make backup copies of critical data. Use the information you find here here at your own risk.